Inspection Jimmy’s G’s in Sinking Spring; 14 violations, beer cooler has mold and yeast build up on ceiling and wall areas, Both ice machine have mold across top interior bin and ice drop chute areas

Inspection Jimmy’s G’s in Sinking Spring; 14 violations, beer cooler has mold and yeast build up on ceiling and wall areas, Both ice machine have mold across top interior bin and ice drop chute areas

Sinking Spring, PA

Jimmy G’s Beverly Hills Tavern

710 OLD FRITZTOWN RD
SINKING SPRING, PA 19608
610-777-4516

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture’s Bureau of Food Safety and Laboratory Services conducted an unannounced retail food inspection on 8/5/2020. As a result of that inspection, and due to the severity of the specific violations Jimmy G’s Beverly Hills Tavern was cited as being, “Out of Compliance” with Pennsylvania’s food safety regulations. During this inspection a total of 14 violations were found.

The inspector made the following comments in support of the violations found during the inspection:

  • The Person in Charge does not have adequate knowledge of food safety in this food facility as evidenced by this non-compliant inspection.
  • Boxes of raw shell eggs stored above ready to eat food items in walk in cooler.
  • Observed open containers of sliced fruits/bar mixers stored in water in reach in cooler in bar area, where it is subject to splash from old water ponding and spilled juice laying in bottom of cooler. Corrected.
  • Assorted foods, which were cooled, were not reheated for hot holding and were 85 degrees and not 165°F for 15 seconds as required. Corrected.
  • Loose/torn rubber door gaskets observed on the drawer cooling unit on cook line.
  • Rubber bands (not an approved material) are attached to broken ends of missing handle to the top compartment of the bain marie to create a handle and must be removed and proper handle installed. (rubber bands removed)
  • Observed deeply scored bain marie cutting boards not resurfaced or discarded as required. Also, exterior bar using a portable cutting board that is chipped and deeply scored. (discarded)
  • Both ice machine have mold across top interior bin and ice drop chute areas.
  • Deli slicer blade guard area a food contact surface, was observed to have old dried food residue and was not clean to sight and touch.
  • Island oasis ice blender bin, a food contact surface, has a large crack down the side that has mold in crack and also duct tape across crack in contact with the ice. Removed from service.
  • Metal shelving equipment, in walk in cooler area, with an accumulation of dirt, food residue that must be cleaned. Also shelving has chipped paint is rusted and must be repaired/replaced.
  • Observed clean food equipment and/or utensils in clean pan rack area, stored wet in a manner that does not allow for draining and/or air drying (wet nesting).*
  • The inside bar handwash sink blocked by equipment and bottles and not accessible at all times for employee use. Also, no soap or towels was available. Corrected.
  • Rear door located in the kitchen area of the food facility has a gap and does not protect against the entry of insects, rodents, and other animals.
  • Wall in the mixer area, has a hole, or is broken and in need of repair. Also wall at dish room doorway has a broken coving tile that must be repaired.
  • Fan box and fan cover area of the walk in cooler of the food facility is extremely dirty, dusty, and in need of cleaning. Also, beer cooler has mold and yeast build up on ceiling and wall areas.
  • Working containers in bar/kitchen area, used for storing *chemicals, cleaners* taken from bulk supplies, were not marked with the common name of the chemical. Corrected.

*Wet nesting refers to the practice of placing two recently-washed items together in a nested fashion, preventing proper airflow. In a moist, dark, low-air environment, unseen bacteria grows unchecked, and suddenly that mixing bowl is a biological incident waiting to happen. Even at high temperatures, the food or ingredients you place on that wet-nested kitchen equipment can act as an accidental insulator, or even as fuel for further bacterial growth.